A scoop of dairy free soy free protein powder being poured into a shaker cup

The Ultimate Guide to Dairy Free Soy Free Protein Powders!

Looking for dairy free soy free protein powders to help boost your protein intake? While I’m definitely a food first kinda person, I also see the value in protein powders as an adjunct to a healthy diet for some people.  In this post, you’ll learn more about the different types of protein and compare ten popular brands that might fit your needs.

Whether you have food allergies and are looking for a safe protein powder, are nursing a baby with MSPI, or simply choose not to include dairy and soy in your diet – this roundup will provide plenty of helpful ideas.

Disclosure:  This post contains affiliate links.  As an Amazon affiliate, I earn a commission from qualifying purchases.  It does not affect your user experience in anyway.

Disclaimer:  This post is for informational purposes only, and should not be construed as medical advice.  Always check with your doctor or dietitian prior to beginning any supplement, especially if you are pregnant or nursing.  Always check the label on the product you are purchasing if you have any concerns about allergens.

First off – why use a protein powder?

Like I mentioned above, I actually don’t think everyone needs a protein powder.  In fact, I’d venture to say that most people don’t need one so long as they can put the time into structuring a healthy diet.

If you take in more protein than your body needs, it can push you over your calorie intake for the day (which isn’t great, unless you’re trying to gain weight).

However, some people find protein powders convenient for certain times or situations.  Here are a few examples:

  • After a workout (you can eat whole foods after a workout, but sometimes people say they don’t feel like eating, and a protein smoothie may be easier to get down)
  • As a meal adjunct/replacement when blended with other nutritious foods (for example, an on-the-go breakfast smoothie with fruit, protein powder, and greens)
  • To make more filling, balanced baked goods like pancakes, muffins, or brownies
  • To help increase protein intake when someone has a limited diet and does not like many protein-rich foods
  • To create more protein-rich breakfasts, which is when most people fall short on protein intake.  (There’s some evidence that it may be ideal to spread protein intake evenly throughout the day.  This can be done with other protein-rich foods though.)

How much protein do you need

If you’re curious about whether you’re meeting your protein needs, you can try multiplying your weight in pounds by 0.36.

For example, 150 lbs x 0.36 = 54 grams per day

This calculation is applicable for an average person who doesn’t exercise a lot, is not pregnant/nursing, and does not have a medical condition that affects protein needs.  If you are nursing, for example, you’ll need around 0.59 grams per pound.  Or if you’re an endurance athlete with a lot of training, you might need around 0.75 grams per pound.

This article from Examine.com goes into a lot more detail about how much protein different people need – but as always, the best option to figure out your needs is to talk to your doctor or dietitian.

Why do so many protein powders contain dairy or soy?

The large majority of protein powders on the market (at least throughout the past 20-30 years) have been whey protein powders.  Whey is one of the two types of protein in milk products (the other, as you may be familiar with, is called casein).

Whey is often the main ingredient in protein powders because it’s quick absorbing.  Quite a bit of research has shown that it’s a great choice in the post-workout time frame, due to it’s essential amino acid content (and in particular, a helpful amino acid called leucine).

Of course, this isn’t helpful at all if you can’t medically have dairy.

When there started to be a larger demand for dairy free protein powders, that’s when we saw a big influx of soy protein powder hit the market.  Soy is a complete protein, similar to animal-based proteins (like whey) which made it a logical choice for many.

Again, though – if you need a soy free protein powder, these products are obviously not useful.

Luckily, there are not a ton of options for dairy free soy free protein powders on the market!

What are the other types of protein?

If you can’t have dairy or soy, then what’s left?  There are several types of plant-based proteins on the market.  These include:

  • Pea
  • Hemp
  • Rice
  • Quinoa
  • Flax
  • Pumpkin seed
  • Sunflower seed
  • Amaranth
  • Chia seed

Some containers might be labeled individually (as in “pea protein” or “rice protein”), and others may simply be labeled plant protein, vegan protein powder, or plant protein complex.  The later are all broad terms, though, and it doesn’t rule out soy in the product.  You’ll need to take a look at the ingredients themselves to see if it does contain soy.

There are also several animal-based proteins that don’t necessarily contain dairy or soy.  These include:

  • Beef bone broth powder
  • Chicken bone broth powder
  • Egg white protein powder

Different proteins and brands may be appropriate for different scenarios.  For example, if you’re looking for a protein powder specifically for a post-workout option, you’ll want to pay attention to the amino acid profile of the product in addition to the grams of protein.

On the flip side, if you’re on a vegan diet and are simply looking for a plant-based protein powder to add a little more protein to your smoothies, then you’d be more concerned with making sure the brand is 100% vegan.

Ready to see some specific brand examples?!

a scoop of chocolate soy free protein powder

Comparison chart of soy free dairy free protein powders

I’m going to break down all of these in more detail below, but I thought it might be helpful to have a quick comparison chart to refer to from the start.  Here are 10 different brands of dairy free soy free protein powders that you might choose from:

Comparison Chart of protein powders Comparison Chart of protein powders10 options for dairy free soy free protein powders

Let’s look at each of these brands in more detail.  Here are a few helpful things to note as you read through this list:

  • The ingredients and allergen information were derived from manufacturer websites and product labels at the time this post was written.  Always check the label on the product you are purchasing if you have any concerns about allergens.  Brands may change product formulations or their websites may not be up to date with current products.
  • Many of these brands have different size scoops in their products, so it’s comparing apples to oranges with protein content.  For example, a scoop that can hold 20 grams weight of product is much smaller than a scoop that can hold 38 grams weight of a product.
  • As you look through the list, remember to keep in mind what you’re using the product for.  Athletes might be concerned about BCAA content and leucine content, while those looking to simply add protein as an adjunct to their diet or to create quick smoothie meals will not need to worry about this.  Those with multiple food allergies may want to find a complete allergen free choice, while those without allergies might be fine using any of the options.  Think about your own needs as you read.

1. NOW Sports Plant Protein Complex

This is one of my very favorite plant protein powders on the market for those who need a dairy free and soy free option.  (Disclosure: client).  It’s a blend of pea, hemp, and quinoa protein.  By blending multiple plant-based proteins, the product is able to get a nice blend of essential amino acids (important if you’re using this to help with workout goals).  It’s also very reasonable as far as price goes compared to many other protein powders, and I love the short clear ingredient list.

  • Protein content:  1 scoop (38 grams) = 22 grams of protein
  • Calories and macros:  140 calories / 2 g fat / 7 g carbohydrate (0 g fiber, 0 g sugar) / 22 g protein
  • Total BCAA content:  3900 mg per serving
  • L-leucine content:  1832 mg per serving
  • Sweetened with:  xylitol and stevia; no added sugar
  • Ingredients (creamy vanilla flavor): Yellow Pea Protein Isolate, Natural Flavors, Quinoa Protein, Xylitol, Hemp Protein, Organic Stevia Leaf Extract, Xanthan Gum, Stevia Leaf Extract (Rebaudioside A).
  • Allergen info:  Not manufactured with yeast, wheat, gluten, soy, milk, egg, fish or shellfish ingredients. Produced in a GMP facility that processes other ingredients containing these allergens.
  • Other: vegan, kosher, non-GMO

–> Click here to learn more and shop for NOW Sports Plant Protein Complex on Amazon.

2. Orgain Organic Plant Based Protein Powder

This is another great option on the market, made of pea protein, brown rice protein, and chia seed protein.  It’s highly rated as far as flavor and texture goes.  This protein powder does have a higher fiber content at 7 grams per serving.  This isn’t as ideal for a post-workout drink, as it can slow the absorption of the protein in that essential post-workout time frame.  However, it is ideal for using in a meal or snack (like a healthy smoothie for an afternoon snack) as it will keep you full longer.

  • Protein content: 2 scoops (46 grams) = 21 grams of protein
  • Calories and macros:  150 calories / 4 g fat / 15 g carbohydrate (7 g fiber, 0 g sugar) / 21 g protein
  • Total BCAA content:  unknown
  • L-leucine content:  unknown
  • Sweetened with:  erythritol and stevia; no added sugar
  • Ingredients (chocolate fudge flavor): Orgain Organic Protein Blend ™ (Organic Pea Protein, Organic Brown Rice Protein, Organic Chia Seed), Orgain Organic Creamer Base ™ (Organic Acacia Gum, Organic High Oleic Sunflower Oil, Organic Inulin, Organic Rice Dextrins, Organic Rice Bran Extract, Organic Rosemary Extract), Organic Erythritol, Organic Natural Flavors, Organic Alkalized Cocoa, Natural Flavor, Sea Salt, Organic Acacia Gum, Organic Guar Gum, Organic Stevia, Xanthan Gum
  • Allergen info:  No top 8 allergens listed in ingredients for this product.  Note that certain Orgain products do contain some allergens – per their FAQ:  “Orgain products are not formulated with eggs, wheat, soy, fish, or shellfish. Peanuts, tree nuts, and dairy are used as ingredients in certain products. Please check the list of ingredients for each specific product you are considering trying.”
  • Other: vegan, kosher, non-GMO, organic, gluten free

–> Click here to learn more and shop for Orgain Organic Plant Based Protein Powder.

3. Growing Naturals Organic Brown Rice Protein Powder

I’ve heard from some moms that they need a dairy free soy free protein powder – but that they (or the baby they’re nursing) can’t tolerate pea protein.  If that’s the case, this product is a good choice, as its only protein source is brown rice.  This is also a nice choice for anyone who doesn’t like stevia, as it doesn’t contain that (or any artificial sweeteners).

Note that brown rice protein generally does contain fewer essential amino acids as a solo protein source compared to something like whey (dairy) protein, but some research has suggested that if you are using it post-workout in larger doses (around 45 grams) you may achieve the same benefits.  (If you’re only using it as a meal replacement or adjunct to your diet, though, no need to worry about this at all.)

  • Protein content: 1 scoop (20 grams) = 15 grams of protein
  • Calories and macros:  80 calories / 0.5 g fat / 3 g carbohydrate (2 g fiber, 1 g sugar) / 15 g protein
  • Total BCAA content:  2835 mg
  • L-leucine content:  1260 mg
  • Sweetened with:  Very small amounts of rice syrup – 1 g sugar per serving.
  • Ingredients (vanilla blast): Organic brown rice protein, natural flavors, organic vanilla flavor, organic guar gum, organic gum acacia, organic rice syrup solids, sea salt.
  • Allergen info:  No top 8 allergens listed on the label; company website lists product as allergen friendly
  • Other: vegan, kosher, non-GMO, organic, gluten free

–> Click here to learn more and shop for Growing Naturals Organic Brown Rice Protein Powder.

4. Amazing Grass Protein Superfood

This is a unique product, because in addition to the protein powder it also as an interesting blend of fruit and vegetable powders added to it.  (Essentially, they take those fruits and veggies and process them down into a blendable powder).

While as an RD I’m not convinced we need those, I also don’t think it hurts to include them if you’re looking for a way to possibly add some extra phytonutrients to your day.  (Of course, whole fruits and veggies are always best though).

The protein blend in this product comes from pea, hemp, chia, and quinoa protein.

  • Protein content: 1 scoop (30 grams) = 20 grams of protein
  • Calories and macros:  110 calories / 2.5 g fat / 4 g carbohydrate (3 g fiber, <1 g sugar) / 20 g protein
  • Total BCAA content:  unknown
  • L-leucine content:  unknown
  • Sweetened with:  The original flavor does not contain a sweetener, though some sweetness is naturally obtained from the types of protein used and the fruit blend.  The other flavors – vanilla, chocolate, etc – contain stevia.
  • Ingredients (“original”): Protein Blend (Organic Pea Protein, Organic Hemp Protein, Organic Chia, Organic Quinoa); Green Food Blend (Organic Barley Grass, Organic Wheat Grass, Organic Alfalfa, Organic Spinach, Organic Spirulina, Organic Chlorella (cracked cell-wall), Organic Broccoli); Fruit & Vegetable Blend (Organic Açai, Organic Banana, Organic Beet, Organic Carrot, Organic Goji, Organic Pineapple, Organic Sweet Potato, Organic Raspberry, Organic Rose Hips). Other Ingredients: Natural Vanilla Flavor, Xanthan Gum, Organic Madagascar Vanilla.
  • Allergen info:  The chocolate peanut butter and peanut butter flavors contain peanuts.  As far as I can see, there are no top 8 allergens listed on the label of the original blend or vanilla.
  • Other: vegan, kosher pareve, non-GMO, organic, gluten free

–> Click here to find out more and shop for Amazing Grass Protein Superfood.

5. Vega Sport Premium Protein

This is a sports-specific protein powder, so great for any of you who are looking for a protein powder specifically for post-workout.  The protein blend in this powder comes from pea, pumpkin seed, organic sunflower seed, and alfalfa protein.  Because there’s such a good mix of plant-based proteins, you end up with a product that has a great branched chain amino acid content and specifically, an excellent leucine content.

There are also some functional ingredients like tart cherry powder added, which may support recovery – though most of the research on that has been done with the juice itself in fairly large quantities.

  • Protein content: 1 scoop (44 grams) = 30 grams of protein
  • Calories and macros:  170 calories / 3 g fat / 6 g carbohydrate (2 g fiber, 1 g sugar) / 30 g protein
  • Total BCAA content:  5100 mg
  • L-leucine content:  2400 mg
  • Sweetened with:  stevia
  • Ingredients (chocolate): Pea protein, Cocoa powder, Pumpkin seed protein, Organic sunflower seed protein, Alfalfa protein, Tart cherry, Probiotics (Bacillus coagulans [provides 1 billion cfu/serving]), Bromelain, Turmeric extract, Black Pepper extract, Beetroot powder (for color), Sea salt, Natural chocolate flavor, Natural vanilla flavor, Natural caramel flavor, Stevia extract, Xanthan gum
  • Allergen info:  There does not appear to be any allergens on the Vega sport premium protein, so it should be good as a dairy free soy free protein powder.  However, if you have a nut allergy, bear in mind the company provides this warning in their FAQ section: “Vega® plant-based protein powders do not use nuts as ingredients, however they are not produced in a certified nut-free facility. For that reason we cannot make the claim that our nutritional shakes are nut free.”
  • Other: vegan, non-GMO, Informed Choice certified, gluten free

–> Click here to find out more and shop for Vega Sport Premium Protein.

6. Ora Organic Vegan Protein Powder

I haven’t personally tried Ora, but it came recommended and I thought it would be good to include on this list.  It’s a soy free and dairy free protein powder with a pea, rice, hemp, amaranth, and quinoa protein base.

One of the interesting things about this supplement is that it also contains digestive enzymes.  Our body normally produces digestive enzymes, but there are some scenarios where you may produce less.  Some people think that digestive enzymes in a protein powder may help you digest it easier.  For example, you can see this product contains protease (to break down proteins), lipase (to break down fats), and amylase (to break down starches).

You can read more about whether digestive enzymes are worth it in this Harvard article.  I’m personally not 100% sold on them in protein powder (I question the survival of some of the enzymes past stomach acid, but data on this is unclear at this point).

Regardless, if you normally have stomach upset when trying protein powder, it certainly can’t hurt to see if Ora might be a good option.  If the digestive enzymes work for you, then by all means, this could be a great option for you.

  • Protein content: 2 scoops (30 grams) = 21 grams of protein
  • Calories and macros:  120 calories / 2.5 g fat / 4 g carbohydrate (1 g fiber, 0 g sugar) / 21 g protein
  • Total BCAA content:  unknown
  • L-leucine content:  unknown
  • Sweetened with:  monk fruit and stevia, no added sugar
  • Ingredients (vanilla):  Organic Pea Protein, Organic Sprouted Rice, Organic Cranberry, Organic Hemp, Organic Sacha Inchi, Organic Sprouted amaranth, Organic Sprouted Quinoa, Organic Acai, Organic Acerola Extract, Organic Apple, Organic Blackberry, Organic Blueberry, Organic Broccoli, Organic Coconut, Organic Jerusalem Artichoke, Organic Kale, Organic Pomegranate, Organic Raspberry, Organic Strawberry, Organic Turmeric. | Digestive Enzymes: Amylase, Protease, Cellulase, Lactase, Lipase. | Other Ingredients: Organic Rice Bran Solubles, Organic Monk Fruit, Organic Natural Vanilla flavors, Organic Vanilla Bean, Organic Acacia, Organic Stevia.
  • Allergen info:  Label specifies that the product contains “no dairy, wheat, gluten, eggs, peanuts, soy, fish, shellfish.”  It does contain coconut.
  • Other: vegan, non-GMO, gluten free

–> Click here to find out more about Ora Organic Vegan Protein Powder.

7. Ideal Raw Protein Powder

If you’re craving fun coffee drinks, the mocha flavor of Ideal Raw protein powder might be right up your alley.  You can blend this into your favorite smoothies for a little mocha twist.  It uses a plant-based protein blend of rice, pea, coconut, chia, sunflower, flax and pumpkin.

The reviews are pretty divided on this, some people hate it and some love it.  I think it tastes pretty good, though I’m not a huge fan of the stevia aftertaste.  Definitely worth a shot to see if you like it though!

  • Protein content: 1 scoop (28 grams) = 15 grams of protein
  • Calories and macros:  130 calories / 5 g fat / 5 g carbohydrate (2 g fiber, <1 g sugar) / 15 g protein
  • Total BCAA content:  unknown
  • L-leucine content:  unknown
  • Sweetened with:  stevia
  • Ingredients (mocha): IdealRaw Plant Protein Blend (Organic Rice Protein, Organic Pea Protein, Organic Coconut Protein, Organic Chia Protein, Organic Sunflower Protein, Organic Golden Flax Protein, Organic Pumpkin Protein), Organic Coconut Milk Powder, Organic Cocoa Powder, Natural Flavoring, Sodium Chloride, Organic Stevia, Organic SuperFruits Blend (Organic Cranberries, Organic Pomegranate, Organic Broccoli, Organic Wheat Grass, Organic Beet Powder)
  • Allergen info:  Contains coconut.  It does not appear the mocha flavor contains other allergens.  There is a banana almond flavor that contains tree nuts, and a peanut flavor that contains peanuts.
  • Other: vegan, gluten free, organic, non-GMO

–> Click here to find out more about Ideal Raw protein powder.

8. Manitoba Harvest Hemp Yeah Max Protein

I’m totally digging the simple ingredient list on this, which makes it easy for a lot of allergy-concious people.  Their unflavored variety only contains hemp and oregano extract.  If you’re sensitive to stevia or other sweeteners, or sensitive to pea protein, this might make an excellent addition to your pantry.

Because it’s unflavored and unsweetened, this works best blended into smoothies or baked goods.  It’s not fabulous just mixed with water on its own.

  • Protein content: 4 tbsp (32 grams) = 20 grams of protein
  • Calories and macros:  140 calories / 6 g fat / 2 g carbohydrate (3 g fiber, 2 g sugar) / 20 g protein
  • Total BCAA content:  unknown
  • L-leucine content:  unknown
  • Sweetened with:  no sweeteners and no added sugar
  • Ingredients (unflavored): Organic hemp protein concentrate, natural oregano extract.
  • Allergen info:  Appears to be top 8 allergen free.
  • Other: vegan, kosher pareve, non-GMO, organic

–> Click here to find out more and shop for Manitoba Harvest Hemp Yeah Max Protein.

9. Manitoba Harvest Hemp Yeah Plant Protein Blend

YES – a protein powder that has real sugar in it!  I know that sounds weird coming from an RD, but hear me out.  Some people love stevia, but I’m not one of them.  I can tolerate it in some products with a good ingredient formulation, but there are a lot of products out there I’m not a huge fan of because of the weird stevia aftertaste.

I love this as an option for those of y’all who want a protein powder to add to your diet, but want a little sweetness from real sugar too.  This differs from their Hemp Yeah Max Protein product because of the added sweetener, and because it’s a blend of hemp and pea protein (rather than just hemp protein).

  • Protein content: 6 tbsp (43 grams) = 20 grams of protein
  • Calories and macros:  160 calories / 3.5 g fat / 15 g carbohydrate (4 g fiber, 8 g sugar) / 20 g protein
  • Total BCAA content:  unknown
  • L-leucine content:  unknown
  • Sweetened with:  coconut sugar in chocolate (7 g added sugar) and vanilla (8 g added sugar); no sweetener in unsweetened
  • Ingredients (chocolate): Hemp Yeah! ™ Plant protein blend (Organic pea protein, organic hemp protein concentrate, natural oregano extract), Organic coconut sugar, Organic cocoa, Natural flavors, Organic vanilla flavor with other natural flavors, Organic guar gum.
  • Allergen info:  Appears to be top 8 allergen free
  • Other: vegan, kosher pareve, non-GMO, organic

–> Click here to find our more and shop for Manitoba Harvest Hemp Yeah Plant Protein Blend.

10. Left Coast Performance Bone Broth Protein Powder

Most of the options on this list are plant-based, but if you’re looking for an animal-based protein (perhaps you’re following a paleo diet, for example) – this could be a good choice.  This protein powder is derived from grass-fed beef bone broth, and that is literally the only ingredient on the label.

The quality of protein in bone broth powder is a bit different than that of a whey protein powder or a mixed plant protein powder.  It contains a variety of amino acids, but tends to be higher in different amino acids – in particular, proline and glycine.  It’s not as high in the BCAAs that are helpful post-workout.  However, these other amino acids may have some benefits like possibly better sleep and musculoskeletal health – you can read more about bone broth benefits in this post.  Anecdotally, some people say that bone broth may help with gut health – though I haven’t seen much evidence to back that up.

So while I wouldn’t necessarily veer to this as my first choice for a post-workout beverage, it is a good option if you’re just looking to include protein regularly in your meals.

  • Protein content: 1 scoop (21.75 grams) = 21.4 grams of protein
  • Calories and macros:  87 calories / 1.4 g fat / 0 g carbohydrate (0 g fiber, 0 g sugar) / 21.4 g protein
  • Total BCAA content:  unknown
  • L-leucine content:  unknown
  • Sweetened with:  no sweetener used
  • Ingredients (unflavored): Organic Grass Fed Bone Broth Protein Powder
  • Allergen info:  Appears to be top 8 allergen free
  • Other: organic, grass-fed, gluten free per manufacturers FAQ

–> Click here to find out more and shop for Left Coast Performance Bone Broth Protein Powder.

Alright ya’ll – there you have it!  I hope this breakdown helps give you a few ideas for protein powders that fit your dietary needs or restrictions.  Keep in mind this is by no means an exhaustive list and I’m sure there are other options on the market that I missed – but I think these are some brands worth highlighting.

Share:  Do you use any soy free dairy free protein powders?  If you’ve tried any on this list, what did you think?

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